March 16, 2017

Academic Programs

Environmental Science and Policy
The Environmental Science and Policy program provides students with rigorous training in the fundamental science of the environment, and in the application of the key scientific principles to the analysis of environmental processes and problems and to the development of practical responses to those problems. The program covers ecological systems, environmental policy, and the fundamental techniques of environmental science and engineering, protection and improvement of environmental quality, and public and private decision-making processes. Graduates of the program are prepared to undertake careers in a variety of environmental science fields, and are also qualified to pursue advanced scientific/professional education. For more information, visit the website.

NOAA @ Northern Virginia B-WET Projects, hosted by GMU PEREC. Photo by Creative Services/George Mason University

Geography and GeoInformation Science (GIS)
The Department of Geography and GeoInformation Science (GGS) offers an outstanding environment to study and perform cutting-edge research in remote sensing, geography, geoinformatics, earth systems science, and their various sub-disciplines. Through these programs, students examine physical and human processes acting at local, regional, and global scales, and develop the scientific and technical skills to map, analyze, and monitor the earth. Studies include courses in human geography, physical geography, regional geography, and techniques courses in cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing, spatial statistics, and earth science. Graduates pursue careers in a variety of fields, including environmental science, transportation, business, engineering, military intelligence, marketing, and public health. For more information, visit the website.

Students and faculty participate in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Day including a student poster competition, 27 local employers and guest speakers from leading GIS organizations. Photo by Evan Cantwell/Creative Services/George Mason University